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Location : WCML

Start date : 27th November 2013

End date : 31st March 2014

The Working Class Movement Library's current exhibition marks the successful oral history project Invisible Histories: Salford's Working Lives.

Salford was an industrial powerhouse for much of the 20th century, employing thousands of local people. Today these industries have vanished, leaving behind only memories.

Volunteers have interviewed people who worked in three different Salford workplaces:
• Agecroft colliery
• Dickie Howarth's cotton mill
• Ward & Goldstone's engineering factory.
They have worked through hours of recorded material to explore themes, identify key events and select extracts to illustrate them. In this exhibition, which is open every Wednesday to Friday 1-5pm until spring 2014, the interviewees' words speak powerfully for them.

The Library has also worked with Year 9 students from Buile Hill Visual Arts College to create a new Radio Ballad, inspired by the pioneering example of Ewan MacColl in the 1950s. Our new Radio Ballad includes not only extracts from the interviews and newly-composed music, but also animations created by the students.

The exhibition can only explore a tiny part of the wealth of memories uncovered during the project. The full interviews, along with summaries, indexes and some transcriptions can be heard at the project Web site InvisibleHistoriesProject.wordpress.com.

The project has taken place thanks to the Heritage Lottery Fund, which awarded £34,000 to the Library.